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Address

1701 Woodroffe Avenue, Nepean, Ontario K2G 1W2

President

Alastair Lawrence - 613 825 2132 alawrence363@sympatico.ca

Secretary

Linda Ross - 613-298-8814

Club History

 

The Ottawa Citizen newspaper reported on August 12, 1988, that the City of Nepean’s Director of Parks and Recreation, Bill Levesque, had stated that Nepean was 'considering installation of an artificial bowling turf'. By June 1989 the bowling area was totally surfaced and the turf was installed in July, although construction was still in progress around the green, and there was no clubhouse. The consulting firm for the project was Wheeler/Douglas (now known as Douglas and Ruhland) and the construction was by H.J. McFarland Ltd., an Ottawa company which is no longer in business.

The club was officially opened on August 29th, 1989, with Nepean mayor, Ben Franklin, throwing the first bowl. Aldermen Reid, Casey, and Loney were also present at the opening ceremonies, along with MP Beryl Gaffney, who presented the club with a New Horizon Grant in the amount of $20,000. This was used to buy chairs, a refrigerator, and dishes – and the unused portion of the grant was returned to Horizon!

Ray Kempster, a retired air force member, and longtime bowler was President of the club for 1989-91. The annual membership fee was $25.00; young children were free, but high schoolers were charged $10.00; there was a $1.00 fee for coaching lessons. Non-members paid $3.00 per game. There were 188 members, 40 of whom were beginners, and 7 qualified coaches.

An Ontario Lawn Bowls publication dated May 1, 1990 , reported a further grant of $70,000 from the Ministry of Tourism and Recreation. On May 25th, 1991, NLB hosted its first tournament, the District #16 'Mixed Fours', which was won by Ottawa’s Elmdale Bowling Club. The clubhouse was officially opened on October 17th, 1991.

In Ontario, there are about 140 clubs with over 8000 bowlers, and worldwide the game is played in 30 countries. In those countries most dedicated to the sport, players compete in televised tournaments with prize money up to $150,000.